Hillsborough United Methodist Church, ca 1860

BWF_5029.jpg

"The new building was completed in 1860. Its high elevation, tall windows, tower, and steeple make it a graceful church building. Captain Berry's use of white trim against red brick gives it a Georgian quality and definitely relates it to the old courthouse. The louvered shutters, galley, original pews, and antique pulpit with fluted columns give interest to the interior of the church. The original building (sanctuary/narthex/balcony/basement) designed by Captain Berry remains intact. When the church was built, the floor slanted down toward the pulpit. A large stove was located at the back of the church. There was another stove where the organ is now located. The pews and pulpit date back to this time.

A local legend tells that during the Civil War, when the Confederates found that they needed more cannons to hold their lines, they asked the church to donate the bell to be melted and added to their cannon supply. The church declined the proposition."

From Hillsborough United Methodist Church's Website.  Read more Here.

The History of Queen's Cross

One consequence of Glasgow’s extraordinary growth in the late 19th century was a wave of new church building undertaken to meet the needs of an expanding population – Queen’s Cross accommodated a congregation of 820!

Queens Cross B&W.jpg
BWF_3234.jpg

In 1896, the Free Church of St Matthew, Glasgow, commissioned a new church and hall from the experienced Glasgow architectural practice of Honeyman & Keppie, to be located in the developing area of Springbank, near Maryhill. John Honeyman allocated the job to his young, talented, trainee architect, Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The site was a tricky one, being bounded on two sides by busy roads, and butted by tenements and a large warehouse. In keeping with their beliefs, the Free Church required simplicity in design.  The foundation stone was laid on 23 June 1898 and the building opened for worship on 10 September 1899.

The construction of Queen’s Cross was contemporary with the first phase of Mackintosh’s masterpiece, The Glasgow School of Art (1897–9). It reveals a sophisticated handling of form, ornament and symbolic meaning, even at this relatively early date. Dr Thomas Howarth, Mackintosh’s first biographer, wrote of the church, ‘the building possesses a warmth and charm conspicuously absent from many churches of the period due largely to the traditional simplicity of Mackintosh’s architectural forms and to the mysticism and spirituality of his decorative motives.’

In 1929 the Free Church was reunited with the Church of Scotland which assumed ownership of Queen’s Cross. In 1976, following a decline in numbers, the congregation merged with that of nearby Ruchill Church and vacated the building. The following year, the newly-formed Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society took on the building as its headquarters and has cared for it ever since.  In 1999 a generous gift from Dr Howarth enabled the Society to purchase the church. A key mission of the Society is to continue to care for and share this wonderful building with as wide a public as possible.

From CRM Society

Ballyvaughan, County Clare, Ireland

Saint John the Baptist Church, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare, Ireland

 Freestanding double-height Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church, built 1858-66, with eight-bay side elevations, gable-fronted three-bay chancel, two-bay single-storey sacristy and two-stage entrance tower and spire. Pitched concrete tile roof with gable copings, finials and cast-iron downpipes. Cut-limestone spire with lucarnes. Snecked limestone walls with stepped buttresses, string course, eaves dentils and some hood mouldings. Pointed arch openings with cut-limestone dressings and cast-iron quarry clear and coloured glazing. Retaining interior features. Graveyard to site with various cut-stone grave markers. Cut-stone piers to front with cast-iron gates and railings.   

Freestanding double-height Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church, built 1858-66, with eight-bay side elevations, gable-fronted three-bay chancel, two-bay single-storey sacristy and two-stage entrance tower and spire. Pitched concrete tile roof with gable copings, finials and cast-iron downpipes. Cut-limestone spire with lucarnes. Snecked limestone walls with stepped buttresses, string course, eaves dentils and some hood mouldings. Pointed arch openings with cut-limestone dressings and cast-iron quarry clear and coloured glazing. Retaining interior features. Graveyard to site with various cut-stone grave markers. Cut-stone piers to front with cast-iron gates and railings.

 

Baptismal Font at Duke Chapel

bwf_5481 I finally made it over to Duke Chapel to take some new photos of the baptismal font I designed when working at Eason & Farlow Design. The Gothic style font is carved from quarter-sawn white oak and features a hand hammered sterling silver basin with  an overlaid cross pattern.  Duke Chapel had never had a baptismal font until this was commissioned in the early 2000s. Our goal was for it to appear as if it had always been there, fitting in perfectly with  Julian Abele's 1932 masterpiece.

Exterior Restoration at St. Timothy's Episcopal Church has begun!

1231-elevThe brick re-pointing, roof repair and masonry restoration has begun at St. Timothy's Episcopal Church in Wilson, NC.  St. Timothy's was constructed in 1906 and is a fine example of Gothic Revival architecture with it's asymmetrical brick tower and Tudor Gothic windows.  We designed a new cast stone cross with symbol for St. Timothy to be located above the main entry.

1231-elev-side

Lumion...test driving some new rendering software

We have used a great number of rendering packages including Podium, 3Ds Max, Revit and now Lumion.  With just a few hours of testing we have gotten some really nice results and are excited about the video capabilities.  Also, the interface is really simple and intuitive.  We will update after more

play

work time.  PS: I really want to build this church, so if anyone is interested, please call us. :) 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church - Greenville, NC

This new church building was designed to seat 450 parishioners and house a new, concert pipe organ which was also designed to be used in conjunction with the School of Music of East Carolina University. The building’s design fits in with its residential surroundings and the smaller existing church, which was converted to a chapel, and provides a dramatic view from downtown Greenville. The exterior is matching brick, and the interior features slate floors in the Nave and Side Aisles and slate and marble in the Chancel. Exposed trusses and clerestory windows enhance the vertical feel of the interior. Custom-built Gothic furnishings in quarter-sawn white oak complete the Chancel. The font is a relocated historic piece from a church in Philadelphia with an enlarged basin in marble mosaic.

“The new building’s acoustics are suitable for the St. Paul’s choir and the East Carolina University (ECU) School of Music.

The new worship space for St. Paul’s Church, Greenville, N.C., was consecrated by the Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel III, Bishop of East Carolina, Feb. 28. Planning for the new church began some years ago, when it became apparent that the existing building could no longer accommodate a fast-growing congregation.

When the present rector, the Rev. Canon C. Thomas Midyette III, newly designated canon theologian for the diocese, came to the parish in 1994, it was with the specific understanding that fund raising would begin immediately for the new church. Construction began in the summer of 1998. The bishop celebrated the first Eucharist in the new building on Christmas Eve. It seats more than twice the number of worshipers as the old building and is fully accessible to persons with physical handicaps.

A particular feature of the new church is the three stained glass rose windows created by artist Brenda Belfield, designer of the “Space Window” at Washington National Cathedral. Another feature is the new building’s acoustical richness. “It was designed very specifically for the acoustics,” said parish member David Crean. With a planned reverberation of some 3.5 seconds, it will be especially suited to the talents of the St. Paul’s choir and the East Carolina University (ECU) School of Music, which will use the space for an additional recital hall. ECU is collaborating in a fund-raising campaign to enable the building of a 60-rank Fisk organ for the building.”

(2000, March). New Worship Space Features Rich Acoustics. The Living Church. Retrieved from http://www.episcopalarchives.org/cgi-bin/the_living_church/TLCarticle.pl?volume=220&issue=12&article_id=15

Eason & Farlow Design, PA - Associate Architect Brad Farlow was the Design Architect & Local Architect during the Construction Phase. Atkin Olshin Lawson-Bell & Associates Tony Atkin, FAIA was the Architect-of-Record

Thomas Sayre Sculpture

The new exterior sculpture by Thomas Sayre was installed last week at Hayes Barton United Methodist Church. It serves as a welcoming beacon to the new addition by Skinner Lamm & Highsmith Architects.

Poulnabrone dolmen portal tomb

Poulnabrone dolmen portal tomb in County Claire, Ireland was one of the most amazing places we visited on our trip to Ireland & Scotland. It is unbelievable to stand in front of something that is 6,000 years old and is one of humanity's first architectural creations that was not designed for protection against the weather.