Scotland Street School Museum in Glasgow

 
Scotland Street School was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh between 1903-1906 for the School Board of Glasgow. With many features built into the stonework and staircases, there is something to admire around every corner!  Now as a museum, it tells the story of 100 years of education in Scotland, from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.  When Scotland Street School first opened on 15 August 1906, it educated the children of families mainly working in shipbuilding and engineering on the south side of Glasgow.  From  Scotland Street School Museum website.

Scotland Street School was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh between 1903-1906 for the School Board of Glasgow. With many features built into the stonework and staircases, there is something to admire around every corner!

Now as a museum, it tells the story of 100 years of education in Scotland, from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.

When Scotland Street School first opened on 15 August 1906, it educated the children of families mainly working in shipbuilding and engineering on the south side of Glasgow.

From Scotland Street School Museum website.

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J.S. Dorton Arena by Matthew Nowicki - 1952

"Nowicki was seeking first of all not for a unique structure but for a unique space. The remarkable warping of the space upward, the exact reverse of a dome, would guarantee maximum daylight admitted from the two sides to the central arena. This labile kind of curvature of enclosed space marks a new epoch in architecture [Parabolic Pavilion 1952]." Paul Rudolph in Architectural Forum; The great Livestock Pavilion complete, 1954

 

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We are fortunate to have a world class mid-century modern structure like Dorton Arena in the Triangle!

We are fortunate to have a world class mid-century modern structure like Dorton Arena in the Triangle!

Stone Walls

"But dreams come through stone walls, light up dark rooms, or darken light ones, and their persons make their exits and their entrances as they please, and laugh at locksmiths."

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

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The Cliffs of Moher

“The sun is setting in a burnt orange sky; the cliffs are black silhouettes; the sea, liquid silver.” 
Laura Treacy Bentley
 

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The History of Queen's Cross

One consequence of Glasgow’s extraordinary growth in the late 19th century was a wave of new church building undertaken to meet the needs of an expanding population – Queen’s Cross accommodated a congregation of 820!

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In 1896, the Free Church of St Matthew, Glasgow, commissioned a new church and hall from the experienced Glasgow architectural practice of Honeyman & Keppie, to be located in the developing area of Springbank, near Maryhill. John Honeyman allocated the job to his young, talented, trainee architect, Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The site was a tricky one, being bounded on two sides by busy roads, and butted by tenements and a large warehouse. In keeping with their beliefs, the Free Church required simplicity in design.  The foundation stone was laid on 23 June 1898 and the building opened for worship on 10 September 1899.

The construction of Queen’s Cross was contemporary with the first phase of Mackintosh’s masterpiece, The Glasgow School of Art (1897–9). It reveals a sophisticated handling of form, ornament and symbolic meaning, even at this relatively early date. Dr Thomas Howarth, Mackintosh’s first biographer, wrote of the church, ‘the building possesses a warmth and charm conspicuously absent from many churches of the period due largely to the traditional simplicity of Mackintosh’s architectural forms and to the mysticism and spirituality of his decorative motives.’

In 1929 the Free Church was reunited with the Church of Scotland which assumed ownership of Queen’s Cross. In 1976, following a decline in numbers, the congregation merged with that of nearby Ruchill Church and vacated the building. The following year, the newly-formed Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society took on the building as its headquarters and has cared for it ever since.  In 1999 a generous gift from Dr Howarth enabled the Society to purchase the church. A key mission of the Society is to continue to care for and share this wonderful building with as wide a public as possible.

From CRM Society

Ballyvaughan, County Clare, Ireland

Saint John the Baptist Church, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare, Ireland

Freestanding double-height Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church, built 1858-66, with eight-bay side elevations, gable-fronted three-bay chancel, two-bay single-storey sacristy and two-stage entrance tower and spire. Pitched concrete tile roof with gable copings, finials and cast-iron downpipes. Cut-limestone spire with lucarnes. Snecked limestone walls with stepped buttresses, string course, eaves dentils and some hood mouldings. Pointed arch openings with cut-limestone dressings and cast-iron quarry clear and coloured glazing. Retaining interior features. Graveyard to site with various cut-stone grave markers. Cut-stone piers to front with cast-iron gates and railings.   

Freestanding double-height Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church, built 1858-66, with eight-bay side elevations, gable-fronted three-bay chancel, two-bay single-storey sacristy and two-stage entrance tower and spire. Pitched concrete tile roof with gable copings, finials and cast-iron downpipes. Cut-limestone spire with lucarnes. Snecked limestone walls with stepped buttresses, string course, eaves dentils and some hood mouldings. Pointed arch openings with cut-limestone dressings and cast-iron quarry clear and coloured glazing. Retaining interior features. Graveyard to site with various cut-stone grave markers. Cut-stone piers to front with cast-iron gates and railings.

 

Construction & Creation

"The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists."
Charles Dickens
 

Alston Ridge Middle School

Alston Ridge Middle School

The Glasgow School of Art

Charles Rennie Mackintosch's masterpiece, "...the only art school in the world where the building is worthy of the subject...this is a work of art in which to make works of art." Sir Christopher Frayling, Educator and Writer.

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Alternative Spaces for Learning

Student learning styles vary. As architects, we must provide a variety of spacial experiences that allow and foster different learning modalities. We look for opportunities to create environments that nurture diversity. In a school, we may provide space for linguistic and logical learning as part of the prescribed program, but spaces for visual, aural, physical, social, and solitary learning are also critical to students’ comprehensive education. Sometimes, these spaces can be incorporated in underutilized design areas, such as a gathering space next to a corridor, an exterior courtyard, or a seating area adjacent to a stair. Not only is it our job to meet an Owner’s expectations, but we must also provide flexible design solutions to meet needs they may not have considered.

Informal learning space

Informal learning space

A stairway can easily become an alternate learning space

A stairway can easily become an alternate learning space

Groundbreaking Celebration for Alston Ridge Middle School

IMG_4536Wake County Commissioners, Wake County School Board Members, Cary Town Council Members and many others braved the wet cold rain to celebrate the construction of WCPSS's latest Middle School Project located in western Cary, NC.  We are proud to be the architect for this exciting project and are looking forward to it's construction over the next year and a half.  The school features flexible collaborative areas, large windows for great views and daylighting, flexible courtyards for outdoor learning, and multiple colors of local brick.Courtyard-01_FotoSketcher