Nursing Simulation Lab for Barton College

 Simulation and Observation Area

Simulation and Observation Area

New lab to support the utilization of the Laerdal simulation platform. Existing lab space to be transformed from a traditional laboratory space to a three-bay simulation lab. The bays are flexible, designed for critical, maternal, and pediatric care with the ability to adapt one of the bays for adult health. Incorporates hygienic practices to develop standard practice. Includes an observation room and briefing room to improve synergy between simulation and learning.

Design Completed 2018

 Conference / Breifing Room

Conference / Breifing Room

New Entry for Phillips Hall at UNC

 New Entry Doors

New Entry Doors

 Before new Entry Doors were added

Before new Entry Doors were added

The interior of this collegiate gothic building did not reflect its exterior appearance. Interior corridor ceilings are covered in conduit, mechanical systems and data runs. The front entry doors were not in character with the building, nor did they meet current egress requirements. We worked with the University and the Departments of Astronomy, Mathematics and Physics on improvements to the entry experience. We designed new front doors and interior designs were studied for various ways to mitigate the appearance of conduit and mechanical systems. New lighting and finishes highlight the departments and minimize the distractions from equipment that cannot be moved. The welcoming space accomodates the waves of student traffic that utilize the area between classes.

Completed 2018

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 Before Renovation

Before Renovation

 After Renovation

After Renovation

Carolina Family Dental Clinic is Complete

 Exterior View

Exterior View

When the Carolina Family Dental Center outgrew its pre-manufactured building, they sought a more welcoming, efficient environment for patients and staff. This economical design provides natural light, a pleasant atmosphere, and the space and technology to meet the needs of its surrounding community.

The center accommodates four dentists with fifteen operatories and a sterilization room. Using building-information modeling, we were able to provide plans that allowed the client to pre-visualize the proposed spaces, as well as the building exterior.

Throughout construction, the clinic was able to maintain uninterrupted operations in their existing facility while new construction took place on the existing site.

This design includes a low-maintenance metal roof and the instillation of a full new vacuum system.

 Interior of Waiting Room

Interior of Waiting Room

ACE Mentor Program Tours Alston Ridge Middle School

We enjoyed participating in the ACE Mentor Program yesterday afternoon for a tour of M16 - Alston Ridge Middle School in Cary. The construction is between 65 and 70% complete and the the students got to see a construction site in full swing. Thanks to Barnhill Constrction Company for hosting the event and PDC for providing insight on the PME Design. It’s great to see so many young people interested in construction, architecture, and engineering!

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From the ACE website: “High school students in the Raleigh/Durham area can now benefit from a nationwide program designed to introduce them to the wide range of career opportunities open to young people in architecture, construction, engineering, and related areas of the building design and construction industry. At weekly meetings, student teams work directly with professionals from leading area firms, who volunteer their time to mentor the teams as they design hypothetical projects, tour local construction sites, and visit architectural, engineering and construction offices.”

BB&T's Former Corporate Headquaters to be Torn Down

We are very saddened to hear about BB&T’s plans to tear down their previous corporate headquarters designed by our founder B. Atwood Skinner.  We think it’s a huge loss for mid-century modernism in North Carolina.  It is as important to preserve our more recent heritage as it is to preserve that from the more distant past. 

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Hillsborough United Methodist Church, ca 1860

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"The new building was completed in 1860. Its high elevation, tall windows, tower, and steeple make it a graceful church building. Captain Berry's use of white trim against red brick gives it a Georgian quality and definitely relates it to the old courthouse. The louvered shutters, galley, original pews, and antique pulpit with fluted columns give interest to the interior of the church. The original building (sanctuary/narthex/balcony/basement) designed by Captain Berry remains intact. When the church was built, the floor slanted down toward the pulpit. A large stove was located at the back of the church. There was another stove where the organ is now located. The pews and pulpit date back to this time.

A local legend tells that during the Civil War, when the Confederates found that they needed more cannons to hold their lines, they asked the church to donate the bell to be melted and added to their cannon supply. The church declined the proposition."

From Hillsborough United Methodist Church's Website.  Read more Here.

Scotland Street School Museum in Glasgow

 
 Scotland Street School was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh between 1903-1906 for the School Board of Glasgow. With many features built into the stonework and staircases, there is something to admire around every corner!  Now as a museum, it tells the story of 100 years of education in Scotland, from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.  When Scotland Street School first opened on 15 August 1906, it educated the children of families mainly working in shipbuilding and engineering on the south side of Glasgow.  From  Scotland Street School Museum website.

Scotland Street School was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh between 1903-1906 for the School Board of Glasgow. With many features built into the stonework and staircases, there is something to admire around every corner!

Now as a museum, it tells the story of 100 years of education in Scotland, from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.

When Scotland Street School first opened on 15 August 1906, it educated the children of families mainly working in shipbuilding and engineering on the south side of Glasgow.

From Scotland Street School Museum website.

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J.S. Dorton Arena by Matthew Nowicki - 1952

"Nowicki was seeking first of all not for a unique structure but for a unique space. The remarkable warping of the space upward, the exact reverse of a dome, would guarantee maximum daylight admitted from the two sides to the central arena. This labile kind of curvature of enclosed space marks a new epoch in architecture [Parabolic Pavilion 1952]." Paul Rudolph in Architectural Forum; The great Livestock Pavilion complete, 1954

 

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 We are fortunate to have a world class mid-century modern structure like Dorton Arena in the Triangle!

We are fortunate to have a world class mid-century modern structure like Dorton Arena in the Triangle!

Stone Walls

"But dreams come through stone walls, light up dark rooms, or darken light ones, and their persons make their exits and their entrances as they please, and laugh at locksmiths."

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

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The Cliffs of Moher

“The sun is setting in a burnt orange sky; the cliffs are black silhouettes; the sea, liquid silver.” 
Laura Treacy Bentley
 

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The History of Queen's Cross

One consequence of Glasgow’s extraordinary growth in the late 19th century was a wave of new church building undertaken to meet the needs of an expanding population – Queen’s Cross accommodated a congregation of 820!

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In 1896, the Free Church of St Matthew, Glasgow, commissioned a new church and hall from the experienced Glasgow architectural practice of Honeyman & Keppie, to be located in the developing area of Springbank, near Maryhill. John Honeyman allocated the job to his young, talented, trainee architect, Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The site was a tricky one, being bounded on two sides by busy roads, and butted by tenements and a large warehouse. In keeping with their beliefs, the Free Church required simplicity in design.  The foundation stone was laid on 23 June 1898 and the building opened for worship on 10 September 1899.

The construction of Queen’s Cross was contemporary with the first phase of Mackintosh’s masterpiece, The Glasgow School of Art (1897–9). It reveals a sophisticated handling of form, ornament and symbolic meaning, even at this relatively early date. Dr Thomas Howarth, Mackintosh’s first biographer, wrote of the church, ‘the building possesses a warmth and charm conspicuously absent from many churches of the period due largely to the traditional simplicity of Mackintosh’s architectural forms and to the mysticism and spirituality of his decorative motives.’

In 1929 the Free Church was reunited with the Church of Scotland which assumed ownership of Queen’s Cross. In 1976, following a decline in numbers, the congregation merged with that of nearby Ruchill Church and vacated the building. The following year, the newly-formed Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society took on the building as its headquarters and has cared for it ever since.  In 1999 a generous gift from Dr Howarth enabled the Society to purchase the church. A key mission of the Society is to continue to care for and share this wonderful building with as wide a public as possible.

From CRM Society

Ballyvaughan, County Clare, Ireland

Saint John the Baptist Church, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare, Ireland

 Freestanding double-height Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church, built 1858-66, with eight-bay side elevations, gable-fronted three-bay chancel, two-bay single-storey sacristy and two-stage entrance tower and spire. Pitched concrete tile roof with gable copings, finials and cast-iron downpipes. Cut-limestone spire with lucarnes. Snecked limestone walls with stepped buttresses, string course, eaves dentils and some hood mouldings. Pointed arch openings with cut-limestone dressings and cast-iron quarry clear and coloured glazing. Retaining interior features. Graveyard to site with various cut-stone grave markers. Cut-stone piers to front with cast-iron gates and railings.   

Freestanding double-height Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church, built 1858-66, with eight-bay side elevations, gable-fronted three-bay chancel, two-bay single-storey sacristy and two-stage entrance tower and spire. Pitched concrete tile roof with gable copings, finials and cast-iron downpipes. Cut-limestone spire with lucarnes. Snecked limestone walls with stepped buttresses, string course, eaves dentils and some hood mouldings. Pointed arch openings with cut-limestone dressings and cast-iron quarry clear and coloured glazing. Retaining interior features. Graveyard to site with various cut-stone grave markers. Cut-stone piers to front with cast-iron gates and railings.